Photo showing a mother and her child safely exiting their safe and comfortable 2017 Acadia mid-size SUV, featuring rear seat reminder technology.
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Acadia’s Rear Seat Reminder Can Help Remind Parents To Check The Back Seat

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, heatstroke was the leading cause of non-crash vehicle-related fatalities for children age 14 and younger.

That tragic fact wasn’t lost on the all-new 2017 GMC Acadia development team. Under certain conditions, the new Rear Seat Reminder1 feature, which is standard on the all-new 2017 Acadia, can help remind parents to check the back seat before leaving the vehicle.

“Acadia’s Rear Seat Reminder is a simple feature designed to do exactly what its name suggests,” says John Capp, director of General Motors’ Global Vehicle Safety Group. “While it does not detect the presence of rear-seat passengers or child seats, under certain conditions it can provide a simple, extra reminder to drivers to take another look inside their vehicle.”

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The Rear Seat Reminder does not actually detect objects in the rear seat. It works by monitoring Acadia’s rear doors. If either rear door is opened and closed within ten minutes before the vehicle is started, or if they are opened and closed while the vehicle is running, the feature is intended to activate.

Once the vehicle is switched off, Acadia is designed to sound five audible chimes and display a visual message within the instrument cluster’s Driver Information Center, which can help remind the driver to take a look at the rear seat before departing.

The feature is active only once each time the vehicle is turned on and off, and would require re-activation on a second trip. Additionally, under some circumstances, the system may activate even though nothing is in the rear seat. For example, if a child were dropped off at school without the vehicle being turned off, the Rear Seat Reminder would still be activated.

 

It is very important that the driver always checks the rear seat before exiting the vehicle.

Rear Seat Reminder is one of several new features incorporated into the all-new 2017 Acadia that were designed with families in mind.

“Many members of Acadia’s development and engineering team are also parents,” Capp says. “Our experiences, along with feedback from customers with children of their own, pushed us to think of ways we could make the new Acadia even more family-focused.”

The all-new 2017 GMC Acadia goes on sale in Spring of 2016. For more information on the all-new Acadia, click here.

The 2017 Acadia Limited does not feature Rear Seat Reminder.

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